Gifts that you will love with your favourite Australian Animals

It’s hard not to break out in a smile when viewing Anna Blatman’s vibrant artwork. Made from Eco-friendly materials, the range is perfect for picnicking or pairing with a delectable breakfast, giving your event a taste of the sensual impressions gained by sitting amongst the paintings in an art gallery.

Your smile will continue to widen when you learn that part of the proceeds from each sale will go towards The Smith Family to help disadvantaged Australian children through education.

 

Kangaroo

Kangaroos have very strong family dynamics demonstrating very caring and protective behaviour between family members. A matriarchal society, the female adult or doe is quick to administer a sharp slap to out-of-line youngsters, or, by the same token, embrace a female family member with kisses and hugs.

Kookaburra

The largest of Australia´s kingfishers, the kookaburra is commonly called the laughing kookaburra. Its distinctive cackle is serious stuff as this how the kookaburra warns other birds to stay away from its territory.  Its habit of laughing at dawn and dusk has earned it the nickname of “bushman´s clock”.

Cockatoo

The sulphur-crested cockatoo is Australia´s most common and largest parrot. It´s a mischievous but very intelligent bird and basks in company. The cockatoo can be taught to speak and, with a lifespan of over 70 years, can keep its owner in good conversation for a long time. Because of its sentimental, lovable nature, the cockatoo requires emotional commitment.

Koala

Koalas are cuddly, grey and cream coloured furry creatures that are native to eastern Australia. They live in eucalyptus trees feeding on the leaves and then sleeping in the crooks of branches for up to 18 hours a day. Like most marsupials, koalas have pouches which their young, called joeys, will climb into after birth, remaining there for the next 6 months.

Wombat

The wombat is that lovable hero found in many Aussie children´s story books. Tales about this cuddly marsupial leave many families with nostalgic memories. Despite its barrel-shaped body, stubby tail and short legs, the amazing wombat can still run up 40 km/hr when threatened.

Koh X

View the range here

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *